LA Funtimes… with the Leica Q (Typ 116)

I recently bought the new Leica Q from Ken Hansen (if you want great Leica dealer–I highly recommend him) and was lucky enough to be able to take it for a spin during a trip to Los Angeles.

LA
Taken with the Leica Q #nofilter

View some photos in the gallery.

This was the first time I’d used the camera, but wow, what an amazing piece of kit. There’s a lovely quote from Ken Hansen to Craig Cutler which I’ve pulled from the Leica Camera blog to share:

“These are the best lenses in the world, choose your f/stop, set your shutter speed, start shooting, and throw away the owner’s manual. It’s that simple.”

I couldn’t agree more.

Like a lot of people I totally fell in love with this camera. It’s next level no-compromise product design. But more importantly I had fun shooting with it–and am looking forward to throwing it my bag, taking more photos, and maybe even becoming a better photographer in 2016.

It’s also an absolute stunner.

(via)

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Introducing my latest project: Google’s New Logo & Identity

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Most of the stuff I work on is confidential so I don’t get to share it publicly—but my last project could hardly be more visible. I’m not going to write lots about it as there’s already plenty of coverage out there. All I wanted to say is that it’s the meatiest (and most rewarding) thing I’ve ever tackled. We kicked the project off in January 2015 with ten people in a room sketching ideas. By the end of August we had over 200+ engineers, designers, writers, product managers, and marketeers preparing to flip the switches on over 30+ product updates. As well as the product updates and a ton of guidelines and toolkits – we also made this Google, Evolved video, a Google Doodle for the occasion, and shared the thinking on the Official Google Blog.

Everything went live on September 1st 2015.

Bonus: we also broke down the process + thinking in much more detail over on the Google Design Blog post  If you’re into how things get made you should definitely take time to read it. You’ll get a better understanding of how the process worked, why the system & framework were designed to hold together, and what we wanted to reflect in the brand by making Google more accessible and useful to our users—wherever they may encounter it.

Here’s a little teaser.

Early this year, designers from all across the company, including Creative Lab and the Material Design team, convened in New York for an intense, week-long design sprint. We drafted a brief that identified four challenges we wanted to address:

  • A scalable mark that could convey the feeling of the full logotype in constrained spaces.
  • The incorporation of dynamic, intelligent motion that responded to users at all stages of an interaction.
  • A systematic approach to branding in our products to provide consistency in people’s daily encounters with Google.
  • A refinement of what makes us Googley, combining the best of the brand our users know and love with thoughtful consideration for how their needs are changing.

It was a huge team effort. Hope you like the work!

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A Study of Time

‘A Study Of Time’ by rAndom International 2011 from rAndom International on Vimeo.

A gorgeous installation that uses light, it’s presence and it’s absence, as a medium for the representation of time.

A vividly illuminated autonomous algorithm magically reveals the time of the day, re-imagining the principle of telling time from falling shadows as a contemporary light installation.

http://random-international.com

Fun with Vinyl

Vinyl will always hold a special place in my heart. So it’s nice to see people doing interesting things with the magic plates.

Linyl

Linyl are discs of light drawn from photos of past experiences that can be played on a special record player to create an ambience. They are inspired by our nostalgia for a time when the experience of music was slower and more environmental.

Analogue Vinyl Sampling

Experimental analog sampling with modified vinyls. Sectors from a vinyl record are cut and replaced by pieces with exact shape from other records. When played in a vinyl player the needle follows the grooves from both sectors creating sampled tunes or loops.